Three-quarters of interviewers check candidates’ social media before interview

74 per cent of employers admitted researching candidates on social media as part of their interview preparation

New research from totaljobs has revealed that three-quarters of interviewers will check candidate’s social media as part of their interview preparation. However, this is not aligned with the expectations of candidates as only a third (36 per cent) expect their social media to be screened, meaning many could be caught short online.

Totaljobs surveyed 8,599 candidates and 268 recruiters on their pre-interview preparation, covering the step-by-step process, from a week before the interview, to a few hours before. The research found a huge gap between the expectations and experiences of candidates and interviewers.

The research also found that 70 per cent of employers spend less than an hour preparing for an interview. In contrast, the study showed that over 1 in 3 (34 per cent) candidates spend over three hours preparing for each interview. In spite of this, one in five (22 per cent) candidates believe that they should spend more time preparing for an interview.

Employers seem to agree with 88 per cent saying that candidates should spend more time researching the company, 81 per cent said candidates should spend more time thinking of questions to ask the employer, 75 per cent said re-reading the job description, 71 per cent said researching the industry and 67 per cent said thinking of potential questions they’ll be asked and how they’ll respond. 49 per cent said re-reading their CV and 48 per cent said figuring out their journey to the interview. 20 per cent said candidates should spend more time choosing their outfit.

This being the case, positively 38 per cent of employers said that, on average, interviewees are more prepared now than they were five years ago.

Matthew Harradine, totaljobs’ Director said: “When it comes to interview preparation, our research reveals a wide discrepancy between candidates’ expectations and employers’ behaviour before and after interviews. Whilst the time spent preparing for an interview is much less for employers than candidates, the anticipated methods of researching online and particularly on social media, are widely underestimated by those being interviewed.

“Interviewers use social media to better understand the person they’re interviewing. Candidates need to make sure that they’re aware of their privacy settings and the effect that public posts can have on whether or not they get the job.”

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