Will the Tories fall apart?

Is Boris after Cam’s job? Or just protecting the City? As infighting breaks out we ask the sources

David Cameron in the House of Commons

Mark Pritchard, MP for The Wrekin:

“It is in the British national interest for the Eurozone to succeed but it is unlikely to do so.”

“Fiscal union would be a major power shift within both the eurozone and the wider European union single market, which would have a high impact on the British national interest.

“Therefore it’s inconceivable that a referendum under the current coalition government’s own legislation could be denied for the rest of this parliament.

“I hope the Prime Minister will show some growth-enhancing euro scepticism and will fight any proposals to tax British pension funds with the financial transactions tax. Also I hope he seeks to repatriate powers from the time directive and make more progress opening the temporary and agency workers directive, all of which cost jobs and billions of pounds to the British tax payers.

“The eurozone construct is fundamentally flawed and however many bailouts or tax payers subsidies they receive, direct or indirect, ultimately the eurozone is likely to shrink considerably or collapse entirely.

“It is in the British national interest for the Eurozone to succeed but it is unlikely to do so. Political leaders need to recognise that across Europe and also recognise that national states have their own monetary and fiscal circumstances which in themselves provide much needed competition and competitiveness that Europe needs.”

Jacob Rees-Mogg, MP for North East Somerset:

“If not the Europeans could say the euro has been destroyed by the beastly Anglo Saxons - they would love it.”

“The Tories are a united euro-sceptic party. A united party with a divided coalition. We expect there to be a singular governmental line that is accepted throughout the party but that simply isn’t the case now. The Lib Dems have a completely different view and so you will have divisions.

“It is up to the Prime Minister how serious these divisions are, if he comes back in Monday having done that he says he will do and protected the UK, it will all be sweetness and light, all the noises the Prime Minister’s office are making have been to that effect but there is still a risk that things won’t work out that way in which case Monday won’t be fun.

“I think Boris makes his point in an exceptional way. He resonates with the public in saying eurozone leaders are “in danger of saving the cancer and not the patient” in their quest to rescue the single currency. In a way that we would be better off with an orderly deconstruction of the Euro. It is condemning countries’ to years of austerity, asking Germany to pay is a silly policy. It is excellent that Boris is making these arguments.

“The Prime Minister and the Chancellor need to be more diplomatic in what they say. If not the Europeans could say the euro has been destroyed by the beastly Anglo Saxons - they would love it. The consequences for the UK of a break-up that we were blamed for would be bad – Boris and the back benchers can say it is all going wrong but it would be very unwise for David Cameron and George Osborne to say the same.”

Graham Stringer, Labour MP for Blackley and Broughton:

“I am with Boris because I think David is extraordinarily weak and has no views on safeguarding the future.”

“I am with Boris because I think David is extraordinarily weak and has no views on safeguarding the future. Take the last Prime Minister’s Question Time for example; Cameron said nonsense about rejecting a referendum on the future shape of Europe. He needs to spell out the plans to boost business interest in the UK and not simply repatriating powers when the recession is staring at us.

“The Tory party has always been split over so many issues, so this is definitely not a first. However, if the party falls apart and we opt out of the referendum this time, the consequences on the economy would be disastrous.”

Stephen Canning, Conservative party councillor, Braintree District Council:

“David Cameron and Boris Johnson are two incredibly close friends who just love to spar!”

“The relationship between David Cameron and Boris Johnson is a relationship we can all relate to: they are two incredibly close friends who just love to spar! Both have known each other for such an incredibly long time, both are Old Etonians and both need each other. The Prime Minister knows that anything other than a victory for Boris Johnson in the 2012 mayoral election will spell disaster (and dare I say it an end) for his premiership.

“Does the Euro debt crisis pit the two men against each other? Technically well yes, but really no. Technically they both now occupy opposite ends of the decision - David advocating the 17 Euro states should be allowed to sign an agreement together as long as it does no harm the UK’s domestic interest and arguing that now is the wrong time for the UK to try and renegotiate its relationship with the EU. Boris however believes that while Europe is weak, now would be a good time for the UK to seek to see what powers it can repatriate.

“But really are they against each other? No I’d say. What you’re really seeing is the difference between a politician who must face an election next year and one who has four years grace. Johnson has to ensure he plays a short game and is in tune with exactly what the public desires at the moment, whilst Cameron on the other hand has the room to be a statesman and make the decisions that are needed to be made to secure the stability of the Eurozone and with it the UK’s long term return to growth and stability.”

Conservative Assembly member James Cleverly:

“Getting a result on national issues will mean nothing if there is economic meltdown in the Eurozone.”

“What is important for London is to get the urgent economic issues resolved. An unplanned and messy exit from the Euro of one of the members could bring about really bad damage. There could be a domino effect which could be catastrophic for the London economy. Whilst Eurosceptics see this crisis as a chance to get everything we want, such as repatriation of powers, what we really ought to be doing is asking what can we do to sort out this crisis. Getting a result on national issues will mean nothing if there is economic meltdown in the Eurozone.”

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