Almost one in three students suffer mental health problems

Study stress

As students and school leavers prepare for their final term of studies before end of year exams, University Cribs, the student property search engine, has launched a new report, First Class, providing an insight into the changing demographics and lifestyle habits of the student population in the UK.

A diverse student population, combining work and studies

There are currently more university students in the UK than ever before – a total of 532,000 people entered into higher education in 2015-16. The demographic of these students is changing; women are now 35 per cent more likely to go to university than men, and students from the least economically advantaged backgrounds in England are 65 per cent more likely to attend university than they were ten years ago.

Student loan is the main source of income for British students, coupled with bank overdrafts or credit cards. With the majority of students’ already low income having to go towards rent, many are subsidising this with part-time employment. University Cribs research shows that on average half of students work at some point throughout the year, 38 per cent during term-time and a further 19 per cent during university holidays.

Mental health concern on campus

Worryingly though, 27 per cent of students now report mental health problems. The primary cause of stress among students is study, with 71 per cent saying that university work is one of their main sources of stress. The next biggest concern for students is finding a job after university (39 per cent), followed by their family (35 per cent).

Commenting on the findings, Jack Jenkins, co-founder of University Cribs, said: “It is clear that today’s students are a smart bunch – they are motivated to work hard, achieve good results and are focussed on finding a job after university. It’s also clear that student living is by no means cheap, and we want to help alleviate the stress of finding and managing student accommodation.”

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